Category: Tagelharpa bridge

Black Tagelharpa with solid Fir structure in high thickness, soundboard and back board in Birch plywood. The incredibly intense black dye is made based on natural pigments Terra di Casselfastened by an oil finishing, also natural, which gives an extraordinary brightness and vividness of color.

Tailpiece, bridge and pegs are made of walnut. Instrument with a warm sound, soft but precise, with a good volume balance between the high and low frequencies. Available in electrified version with internal piezo pickup and standard jack socket 6. Natural black dye: check also Black Tagelharpa.

To order, for more information, to ask for audio files or estimates of shipping costs, customizations or different features, please send an email to: info camillamargheritaferrari.

For different features, customization or decoration, please send an e-mail with the description to info camillamargheritaferrari. Because the instruments are also customizable, maybe not all the models are completely finished and immediately available for sale. When they're not, realization time could vary from 2 to 6 month depending on the phase of manufacture, of the finishing and on the workload at the moment of ordering: the necessary time will be comunicated in the response to the order before confirming or following your request by e-mail.

Since the instruments are handcrafted, the measures may slightly vary as well as the tones of color because of the different colors of wood, different from plant to plant, and the alteration due to photography and the type of display monitor. The tagelharpa Deep Black fir and birch has a structure made of solid Fir in high thickness, and the soundboard and the back board made of Birch plywood, a very stable material and reliable over time.

The bridge and the tailpiece are made of National Walnut handmade as the pegs, built one by one, individually. The Deep Black owes its incredibly intense dark color to the Terra di Cassel, a pigment of natural origin and very stable to the light used for the dye, fastened and enlighted by the oil finishing.

The three strings are made with black horsehair compounds in different number for melodic string, high drone and low drone.

The finnish Jouhikko or Bowed Lyre

The Tagelharpa also called Talharpa is a bowed lyre orgined in northern Europe. It spread widely in Scandinavia after the Viking age and is still used in some of the northern territories of particular importance the tradition of the Estonian islands. Also widely spread its close Finnish relative, the Jouhikko.

Natural black dye: check also Black Tagelharpa To order, for more information, to ask for audio files or estimates of shipping costs, customizations or different features, please send an email to: info camillamargheritaferrari.

SKU: sca Category: bowed lyres. Description Description. This site uses cookies, also Third Party. Continuing in the navigation or by clicking OK, you are consenting to their use. OK More information.Tagelharpa Cello Scandinavian Lyre - Bowed lyre.

The Tagelharpa Cello, called in this way for her extraordinary voice big, full, precise and powerful that reminds the shade and depth of the sound of the cello, has a structure in carefully selected spruce for the best acoustic and structural characteristics.

The soundboard is made of resonant fir from Val di Fiemme that, with the generous dimensions, allows in addition to the lower tonal range than a normal Tagelharpa, a precision and a surprising volume for this type of instrument. Also for the back has been used the same resonance fir of the Val di Fiemme of the soundboard which, in this position, reinforces the lower notes giving the sound a great fullness in every harmony, produces environmental reverberations that generate an engaging aperture and sound dimension and transmits the vibrations to the musician, connecting through the bodily transmission of sounds to the deepest psyche.

Available in electrified version with internal piezo pickup and standard jack socket 6. To order, for more information, to ask for audio files or estimates of shipping costs, customizations or different features, please send an email to: info camillamargheritaferrari.

For different features, customization or decoration, please send an e-mail with the description to info camillamargheritaferrari. Because the instruments are also customizable, maybe not all the models are completely finished and immediately available for sale. When they're not, realization time could vary from 2 to 6 month depending on the phase of manufacture, of the finishing and on the workload at the moment of ordering: the necessary time will be comunicated in the response to the order before confirming or following your request by e-mail.

Since the instruments are handcrafted, the measures may slightly vary as well as the tones of color because of the different colors of wood, different from plant to plant, and the alteration due to photography and the type of display monitor.

tagelharpa bridge

As always in our best instruments, it is complemented by accurate harmonic measures of the soundbox and of the structure, to create precise and clean sounds, the pegs are inserted into hardwood bushings for better stability and efficiency, the bridge and the soul are the result of long and painstaking experiments to achieve the best tonal balance.

The Tagelharpa Cello is an instrument for which words can describe the quality, attention to details and the main features, but only listening to it, and especially trying it, it is possible to understand the real magnitude.

Ferrari Youtube. The Tagelharpa also called Talharpa is a bowed lyre orgined in northern Europe. It spread widely in Scandinavia after the Viking age and is still used in some of the northern territories of particular importance the tradition of the Estonian islands. Also widely spread its close Finnish relative, the Jouhikko.

Tagelharpa Cello quantity. SKU: sca Category: bowed lyres. Description Description. This site uses cookies, also Third Party. Continuing in the navigation or by clicking OK, you are consenting to their use. OK More information.Tagelharpa Mahogany Nordic Lyra - Bowed lyre. Tagelharpa entirely made of solid mahogany, with bridge, pegs and tailpiece made of walnut. The model has a dark, soft and slightly gloomy sound than the other models, enveloping and characterized by very marked low frequencies.

Available in electrified version with internal piezo pickup and standard jack socket 6. To order, for more information, to ask for audio files or estimates of shipping costs, customizations or different features, please send an email to: info camillamargheritaferrari.

For different features, customization or decoration, please send an e-mail with the description to info camillamargheritaferrari.

Because the instruments are also customizable, maybe not all the models are completely finished and immediately available for sale. When they're not, realization time could vary from 2 to 6 month depending on the phase of manufacture, of the finishing and on the workload at the moment of ordering: the necessary time will be comunicated in the response to the order before confirming or following your request by e-mail. Since the instruments are handcrafted, the measures may slightly vary as well as the tones of color because of the different colors of wood, different from plant to plant, and the alteration due to photography and the type of display monitor.

Mahogany tagelharpa. The structure of the instrument, including the soundboard, is entirely made of solid Mahogany. The bridge, the tailpiece and the cord holders are made of National Walnut, worked by hand as well as the pegs, built one by one individually.

The lyre is finally finished with oil.

Ancient Walnut Tagelharpa – Fir and Birch

The strings are made of black horsehair, carefully selected, compounds in different number for melodic string, high drone bordone alto and low drone bordone basso. The Tagelharpa also called Talharpa is a bowed lyre orgined in northern Europe. It spread widely in Scandinavia after the Viking age and is still used in some of the northern territories of particular importance the tradition of the Estonian islands.

Also widely spread its close Finnish relative, the Jouhikko. Mahogany Tagelharpa quantity. SKU: sca Category: bowed lyres. Description Description. This site uses cookies, also Third Party. Continuing in the navigation or by clicking OK, you are consenting to their use. OK More information.Ask your beginner questions and learn to play your favorite tunes!

All who love the Appalachian dulcimer are welcome here no matter what your style, skill level, or musical tastes. Fear not! After joining, please read the Site Rules before posting. You'll find your very own Member Profile Page by clicking on your name in the links navigation bar across the top of any page. Click on different areas and links to get familiar with where things are.

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Welcome to Friends of the Mountain Dulcimer! Friends of the Mountain Dulcimer is the most active and extensive site for Appalachian Mountain Dulcimer players and builders on the internet. Latest Activity. My all time favorite song. Love your playing and your instrument. Have already played it three times and will listen again. Apologies for the ending, I was going into another tune at that point so just stopped it in between the two.

Perky and clean playing. I surmise you developed your arrangement from the notation in O'Sullivan's International shipping may be higher. I hope everyone is doing ok. Thought I'd share a lesser-known Carolan tune. About Carolan tunes are known, but we typically only hear maybe And how cool that he and his son were able to collaborate so closely.

Nothing muddled.

tagelharpa bridge

Like a fresh mountain spring on a cool morning. Nice playing, as There are noTagelharpa with a structure made of thick, solid Fir, sounboard and backboard made of Birch plywood. Mordant stained, with tailpiece, bridge and pegs made of walnut.

Instrument with an open, vivid and full sound, slightly brighter than the Black model, with a good volume balance between high and low frequencies. Available in electrified version with internal piezo pickup and standard jack socket 6. To order, for more information, to ask for audio files or estimates of shipping costs, customizations or different features, please send an email to: info camillamargheritaferrari. For different features, customization or decoration, please send an e-mail with the description to info camillamargheritaferrari.

Because the instruments are also customizable, maybe not all the models are completely finished and immediately available for sale. When they're not, realization time could vary from 2 to 6 month depending on the phase of manufacture, of the finishing and on the workload at the moment of ordering: the necessary time will be comunicated in the response to the order before confirming or following your request by e-mail.

Since the instruments are handcrafted, the measures may slightly vary as well as the tones of color because of the different colors of wood, different from plant to plant, and the alteration due to photography and the type of display monitor.

The tagelharpa has a structure made of thick solid Fir, and the backboard and the soundboard are made of birch plywood, a stable and reliable material over time. The bridge and the tailpiece are made in National Walnut, worked by hand as the pegs, built one by one individually.

The tagelharpa is finished with mordant and oil but, at request, it can finished also with transparent water-based varnish for a higher protection; tailpiece, bridge and pegs are oil finished. The three strings are made of black horsehair, in different number for melodic chord, high drone and low drone.

The Tagelharpa also called Talharpa is a bowed lyre orgined in northern Europe. It spread widely in Scandinavia after the Viking age and is still used in some of the northern territories of particular importance the tradition of the Estonian islands. Also widely spread its close Finnish relative, the Jouhikko.

Tagelharpa Antique Walnut - Spruce and Birch quantity. SKU: sca Category: bowed lyres. Description Description. This site uses cookies, also Third Party. Continuing in the navigation or by clicking OK, you are consenting to their use. OK More information.The bridge saddle location of the guitar, bass guitar, mandolin, ukulele and of most fretted instruments is moved a bit back from its nominal location. This change in location is called bridge saddle compensation.

Without it, all fretted notes will play sharp to some extent, due to stretching of the string during fretting and also bending stiffness. Compensation effectively lengthens the string length of fretted notes. The longer string lengths make the pitch of the fretted notes flatter, thus compensating for the sharping effects. This page contains an online calculator which can be used to calculate compensation. The calculator provides individual string compensation values and also straight saddle compensation for instruments that feature a straight angled saddle.

It contains data for a number of types of instruments and can be easily used to calculate compensation values for those instruments. The calculator can also be used to calculate compensation for non-standard instruments. Looking for a calculator that will tell you how much to move the string contact point of the saddle of an existing instrument to achieve accurate intonation? Initial appearance: July 17, Last updated: July 01, The scale length of an instrument is the distance between the edge of the nut and the nominal bridge saddle position.

For guitars and other fretted instruments the placement of the frets is based on the scale length. See the page entitled Calculating Fret Positions on this site for more info on fret placement. For fretless instruments the bridge is generally located at the nominal bridge position. If the bridge was located here for fretted instruments though, the pitch of each note would be sharp and this sharpness would increase the farther up the neck you went.

There are two major factors involved with this phenomenon. The first is that the strings of an instrument are positioned at some distance over the frets. The distance is small, but pressing a string down to a fret stretches it a little, which raises its tension a little, which raises its pitch. The other factor is that strings exhibit bending stiffness, and this increases the vibrating frequency of the string a bit, which also sharpens the pitch.

How much pitch is sharpened depends primarily on the stiffness of the string, or for wound strings, of the string's core. This stiffness is a function of the diameter of the string and also of the material it is made of. The solid nylon of the upper classical guitar strings and the nylon floss of the cores of the lower strings is not very stiff, so stretching the strings while fretting doesn't raise the pitch all that much. Consequently not much compensation is required.

Contrast that with the solid steel of steel guitar strings, which is quite stiff. Fretting steel strings raises their pitch significantly and they require more compensation. No matter what the material, the bigger the diameter of the string corethe stiffer it is, so large diameter solid strings will need more compensation than thinner ones.

The generally accepted solution to this sharping problem is to move the bridge saddle a bit farther away from the nut. This effectively increases the length of the string from fret to bridge saddle, which flattens the pitch and thus provides some compensation for the sharping effects described. Bridge-only compensation is by no means a mathematically perfect solution, but in practical terms it may very well provide a solution which is well within the limits of variability which is not under the builder's control string mass variability, note-to-note fretting pressure variability 1etc.

Its persistent and widespread use may attest to its practical utility. Likewise the limited use of systems and devices claimed to improve intonation beyond what is provided by bridge saddle only compensation, even though such systems and devices have been available for quite some time, may indicate that bridge saddle only compensation is in fact functionally optimal.

Recent research suggests that all popular compensation strategies are perceptually equally effective. Just to define the term: Bridge compensation is the distance the bridge saddle must be moved from the nominal bridge saddle position to achieve the desired compensatory results. For the most part compensation has historically been calculated empirically.

An instrument was set up with the bridge saddle located at the nominal bridge position, and then it was moved back by increments until both the open string and the fretted octave were in tune. This is still the way it is done for instruments like electric guitars that have intonation adjustment available.

For instruments with fixed bridges and saddles, like typical acoustic guitars, once compensation was figured out, the compensation distance s was recorded and future instruments were simply built with the bridge saddle s located at the derived position. It should be noted that each string will usually have its own compensation value. Most acoustic instruments will make use of a straight angled saddle though.After listening to Wardruna for a while I thought it would be a nice experience to play an acoustic instrument other than a guitar — something that would play and sound different.

I stumbled upon this traditional Karelian instrument, jouhikkowith much resemblance to Scandinavian talharpa. I am chronically broke. It occurred to me that if I wanted to have this instrument I would have to build it myself. Much less experience in instrument building. I thought this project could teach me some basics in both. I got a general idea of what the instrument is by looking at pictures.

Basically: a sound box with a spruce top like an acoustic guitar, but stringed and played with a bow. More resemblances to a violin: a floating string holder, a narrow bridge held against the top by the tension from the strings. No nut, just tuning pegs. No fretboard, you just touch the strings to alter their tune without pushing them against wood.

Strings are traditionally pushed with the knuckle sides, but not necessarily.

A Tergo Lupi - Dusk (Tagelharpa Cello & Ritual Drum)

My guess is that this is the traditional way. Some jouhikkos are made with a hand hole would let you touch only the uppermost string.

tagelharpa bridge

Most players I have seen on YouTube touch all the strings anyway and have a wider array of notes and chords. Those that fell into category 1 had horsehair strings, wooden tuning pegs, etc. Those of category 2 could have nylon strings, modern screws, electric guitar tuners etc.

I decided to place my project somewhere in the middle and to leave something for improvisation during the project. I wanted to design a jouhikko that would look traditional, but to also have some primitive decorative elements that I could make with my nonexistent carpenter skills.

For the whole build, I snatched an idea from a YouTube video that had a really straight forward spare wood approach to building a tagelharpa. I started sketching. I came up with an idea of these rough Celtic-type decorations for the headstock.

I wanted them to rise from the base level so that they would have a resemblance to a viking boat fore. They would also protect the tuning pegs from being hit against something. At first I drew the whole instrument very wide, something like mm. I decided it looked like a huge square and took an exacto knife and just cut a piece out from the midle of my drawing.

Ancient Walnut Tagelharpa – Fir and Birch

It accidentally gave birth to the peak in the middle of the headstock. After the headstock, I just drew a box downwards. I drew the rest accordingly. Unlike the video that I used for the 3 plank layer idea, I decided to glue the top and bottom in and to plane a place for the top so it would be embedded nicely into level with the neck. This is shown in the main picture. Olet kommentoimassa WordPress. Nimi pakollinen. Post to Peruuta.


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